It’s Official — Transitional Relief or “Keep Your Plan” for Small Groups Extended Through 2018

The Transitional Relief Provision has been extended as expected at least through December 31, 2018. We reported on it last week here. Small employers with non-ACA compliant or “grandmothered” plans will once again have the option to keep those plans in place until the end of 2018.  Carriers will be notifying policy holders about renewal options in the near future.  BBG clients please contact us anytime if you have any questions or need assistance.

Here is the official CMS release announcing the extension of the Transitional Relief/Keep Your Plan Provision.

MEDICARE PANIC SETTING IN AS EMPLOYEES APPROACH 65th BIRTHDAY??? LET’S CLEAR UP THE CONFUSION ABOUT INITIAL ENROLLMENT

Can’t tell you how many calls and emails we get from panic-stricken employees nearing that magic 65th birthday and Medicare eligibility.  It happens a lot.  A whole lot.

Some folks think if they don’t sign up three months before they turn 65 they’ll be in trouble. Others think the drop dead date to sign up is their birthday.  And, many, many people think if they don’t enroll in Medicare by those dates they either won’t be eligible at all, or they’ll be penalized and get socked with much higher premiums.

Here’s the scoop:

THE MEDICARE INITIAL ENROLLMENT PERIOD IS 7 MONTHS LONG.  IT INCLUDES YOUR BIRTHDAY MONTH, THE 3 MONTHS BEFORE AND THE 3 MONTHS AFTER.

Here are some basics, courtesy of Medicare Made Clear, that employees approaching their 65th birthday may want to know and save them from hitting the panic button:

1.)  You Have a Set Time to Enroll in Medicare

Your Medicare Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) is 7 months long. It includes:

  • The 3 months before the month you turn 65
  • The month you turn 65
  • The 3 months after the month you turn 65

Medicare Enrollment Date Calculator.

2.)  You Can Delay Medicare Part B

Most people get Part A (hospital insurance) premium-free because they or a spouse worked and paid taxes. Part B (medical insurance) has a monthly premium.

You can delay signing up for Part B if you have other health care coverage like employer-sponsored health coverage.  Having employer-sponsored health coverage gives you to the option to delay signing up for Part B, qualifies you for a Special Enrollment Period, and precludes you from getting hit with Late Enrollment Penalties if you elect to delay Part B.

3.)  There Are Two Ways to Get Medicare

Medicare gives you two Medicare Coverage Options:

  • Original Medicare (Parts A & B), the traditional way
  • Medicare Advantage (Part C), an alternative to Original Medicare

Original Medicare is administered by the federal government. Medicare Advantage plans are offered by private insurance companies approved by Medicare. They must provide all the same benefits as Original Medicare Parts A and B. Many plans include additional benefits, such as prescription drug coverage and more.

4.)  Medicare Doesn’t Cover Everything

Original Medicare doesn’t include coverage for prescription drugs. You may buy a standalone Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D) plan to get this coverage.

Some people also buy a Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) plan to help with some costs not paid by Original Medicare.

Generally, you don’t need additional coverage if you choose a Medicare Advantage plan.

 

7 Months. That should make some breathe easier.

UnitedHealthcare News Release Indicates Small Group Transitional Relief Plans (pre-ACA) Are Likely To Be Extended Beyond 2017

While we wait to see what happens with the New Trump Administration’s plans to repeal and replace………….

In a recent field communication pertaining to Small Group renewals, UnitedHealthcare (UHC) announced that they were making provisions for small employers with non-ACA compliant plans to have the option to keep those plans in place beyond 2017. This “Keep Your Plan” option from UHC is contingent upon the Transitional Relief provision being extended again as expected.  Our guess is that some of other carriers in the Small Group market will follow suit.

The Transitional Relief provision was first enacted when the ACA went into full effect in 2014. Often referred to as the “Keep Your Plan” provision, this provision was extended twice after it first went into effect.  Under the last extension all plans not compliant with ACA were set to expire 12/31/2017.

In January, the new Trump Administration issued a memo “to waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation of any provision or requirement of the [ACA] that would impose a…cost…or regulatory burden on individuals, families, [or]…purchasers of health insurance.” UHC’s move indicates they expect the new Administration to issue another “Keep Your Plan” extension and that the expiration date will be postponed for at least another year (through 2018) and perhaps indefinitely.

UHC indicated that the Transitional Relief notice applies to: Arizona, Arkansas, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin.

We’ll be following closely and will keep our clients, especially those who currently have Transitional Relief Plans, posted.

For more info click on the links below:

Trump Administration Aims to Reduce Regulatory Burden

Previous Extension of Transition Policy for Non-ACA Compliant Health Plans Issued 2_29_16

Facebook Iconfacebook like buttonTwitter Icontwitter follow buttonVisit Our LinkedIn Profile