medicare

Highlights from Wide-Ranging Interview with Atul Gawande, Head of the New ABJ (Amazon/Berkshire/JP Morgan Chase) Healthcare Endeavor, Provides Glimpse of Vision and What They Hope to Accomplish

(Note: In keeping with our 2 Minute Drill mantra, we’ve broken this into two parts. Today in Part 1 we’ll highlight Gawande’s view of the three big systemic problems with healthcare. Tomorrow in Part 2 we’ll summarize his vision for the ABJ-HCE.)

Last week Amazon/Berkshire/JP Morgan Chase announced the appointment of renowned author, surgeon, and researcher Atul Gawande to head up their ambitious new “Amazon/Berkshire/JP Morgan Chase healthcare endeavor” (still unnamed, we’ll refer to it as ABJ-HCE for now). In a long form interview at the Aspen Ideas Festival Gawande expounded on his view of the problem facing the U.S. healthcare system and his thoughts on what the ABJ-HCE can do to make the whole system work better.

Here are few of Gawande’s thoughts that struck me as I watched the interview:

  • While healthcare comprises 18% of the U.S. economy, 30% of those expenditures are of no benefit to the patient.
  • The three biggest sources of waste are:
    • Very high administrative costs. He said there are a lot of “middlemen” in the system some of which must be taken out of the system to simplify the equation.
    • Pricing (I think he’s referencing the price of healthcare services and the method of paying providers for the services)
    • Mis-utilization of treatment. This is identified as by far the biggest of the three buckets. He defined mis-utilization as the wrong care, delivered at the wrong time, and in the wrong way.
  • On the reality of our healthcare system:
    • It was built in the 1940’s and 1950’s when there were only a handful of treatments.
    • Then: A system where the clinician could be expected to do it all – administer the right medicine and treatment. Add in some staff and a place for the patient to recover otherwise leave the clinician alone to do it all.
    • Now: We’ve discovered in the last century that the number of illnesses we can have and the number of ways the human body can fail exceeds 70,000 (covering 13 organ systems).
    • And, in the last fifty years we’ve generated 4,000 new surgical procedures and 6,000 new drugs.
    • Yet, we’re still deploying all these new discoveries and capabilities on a 40’s and 50’s system where the clinician will take care of it.

Gwande points to a broken system. Healthcare is now so complex “that everybody involved feels it’s out of their control – payors, patients, and providers — with no real influence over the end results. “Obamacare is on life support” and “even though I’m going to work for a bunch of employers, employer-based care is broken”.

Tomorrow in Part 2, Gawande on what’s needed, what ABJ-HCE brings to the table, and achieving his goal for the endeavor:  “Scalable solutions for better healthcare delivery everywhere”.

Health Coverage By the Numbers

Job-based health insurance is the largest single source of health care coverage in the U.S.

1.) Employer-sponsored insurance covers more than 157  million workers and their dependents.

2.) The next largest source of coverage, Medicaid, insures less than half as many, 63 million.

3.) Medicare enrolls 45 million;

4.) Individual market (on/off Marketplace) provides coverage for about 21 million.

Source: Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF.org)

 

MEDICARE PANIC SETTING IN AS EMPLOYEES APPROACH 65th BIRTHDAY??? LET’S CLEAR UP THE CONFUSION ABOUT INITIAL ENROLLMENT

Can’t tell you how many calls and emails we get from panic-stricken employees nearing that magic 65th birthday and Medicare eligibility.  It happens a lot.  A whole lot.

Some folks think if they don’t sign up three months before they turn 65 they’ll be in trouble. Others think the drop dead date to sign up is their birthday.  And, many, many people think if they don’t enroll in Medicare by those dates they either won’t be eligible at all, or they’ll be penalized and get socked with much higher premiums.

Here’s the scoop:

THE MEDICARE INITIAL ENROLLMENT PERIOD IS 7 MONTHS LONG.  IT INCLUDES YOUR BIRTHDAY MONTH, THE 3 MONTHS BEFORE AND THE 3 MONTHS AFTER.

Here are some basics, courtesy of Medicare Made Clear, that employees approaching their 65th birthday may want to know and save them from hitting the panic button:

1.)  You Have a Set Time to Enroll in Medicare

Your Medicare Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) is 7 months long. It includes:

  • The 3 months before the month you turn 65
  • The month you turn 65
  • The 3 months after the month you turn 65

Medicare Enrollment Date Calculator.

2.)  You Can Delay Medicare Part B

Most people get Part A (hospital insurance) premium-free because they or a spouse worked and paid taxes. Part B (medical insurance) has a monthly premium.

You can delay signing up for Part B if you have other health care coverage like employer-sponsored health coverage.  Having employer-sponsored health coverage gives you to the option to delay signing up for Part B, qualifies you for a Special Enrollment Period, and precludes you from getting hit with Late Enrollment Penalties if you elect to delay Part B.

3.)  There Are Two Ways to Get Medicare

Medicare gives you two Medicare Coverage Options:

  • Original Medicare (Parts A & B), the traditional way
  • Medicare Advantage (Part C), an alternative to Original Medicare

Original Medicare is administered by the federal government. Medicare Advantage plans are offered by private insurance companies approved by Medicare. They must provide all the same benefits as Original Medicare Parts A and B. Many plans include additional benefits, such as prescription drug coverage and more.

4.)  Medicare Doesn’t Cover Everything

Original Medicare doesn’t include coverage for prescription drugs. You may buy a standalone Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D) plan to get this coverage.

Some people also buy a Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) plan to help with some costs not paid by Original Medicare.

Generally, you don’t need additional coverage if you choose a Medicare Advantage plan.

 

7 Months. That should make some breathe easier.

Definition of Predicament: People Who Don’t Have Access to Employer Coverage, Aren’t Medicare Eligible, and Don’t Qualify for Subsidies

Yes, this is a bit anecdotal. Nevertheless, I think it’s  worth reporting and some may find it interesting.

First, recently our team managed the annual open enrollment process for the group health plan of one of our employer clients. After a quick but thoughtful evaluation of options, one employee who was previously covered by an individual market policy opted to enroll on the employer’s group plan (family coverage) and terminate coverage under the individual market plan. Both the individual plan and the group plan were Qualified Health Plans (QHP) under ACA. The plans had similar benefits. And, they were underwritten by the same large insurance carrier.

Savings?

$600 a month in gross premium. That’s quite a spread.  Add in the employer contribution and the savings to the employee were even greater.

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