subsidies

Executive Order Ends the “Out-of-Pocket” Subsidy Only; the “Premium” Subsidy Remains in Place

Some folks may think that Friday’s Executive Order did away with Obamacare subsidies altogether.  It didn’t.

There are two subsidies. One was cut.  One wasn’t.

In a nutshell, one subsidy lowers the cost of premium (aka premium tax credits) for those qualified individuals and families enrolled through the exchange and making less than 400% above the poverty level.  This stays in place.

The other covers a reduction in the out-of- pocket expenses or claims costs paid to the medical provider by the patient (aka cost-sharing reductions). This subsidy applies to those earning below 250% of the poverty level and covered by a plan issued by the insurance company through the exchange.

It’s this out-of-pocket budget appropriation that was cut by Friday’s Executive Order.

From what we hear, despite Friday’s Order most of those enrollees who qualify for the out-of-pocket assistance will continue to receive it as part of their coverage at least through 2018.  Many of the insurance carriers still participating on the exchange expected the subsidy cut and planned for it when they filed their rate increases and established their pricing for 2018.

You can read more here.

EMPLOYER REIMBURSEMENT OF INDIVIDUAL HEALTHPLAN PREMIUMS REMAINS A BANNED PRACTICE UNDER ACA

While this was more of a hot topic when the full monty of healthcare reform was implemented back in 2014, some employers perhaps unaware of the turmoil in the individual marketplace still ask about reimbursing employees for individual health insurance policies.

The IRS, the Department of Labor and Health and Human Services have all released several directives and guidelines that pretty clearly prohibit the practice. The most recent was issued in December 2015 (n-15-17).

Definition of Predicament: People Who Don’t Have Access to Employer Coverage, Aren’t Medicare Eligible, and Don’t Qualify for Subsidies

Yes, this is a bit anecdotal. Nevertheless, I think it’s  worth reporting and some may find it interesting.

First, recently our team managed the annual open enrollment process for the group health plan of one of our employer clients. After a quick but thoughtful evaluation of options, one employee who was previously covered by an individual market policy opted to enroll on the employer’s group plan (family coverage) and terminate coverage under the individual market plan. Both the individual plan and the group plan were Qualified Health Plans (QHP) under ACA. The plans had similar benefits. And, they were underwritten by the same large insurance carrier.

Savings?

$600 a month in gross premium. That’s quite a spread.  Add in the employer contribution and the savings to the employee were even greater.

King v. Burwell: With Decision Imminent It’s Still Anybody’s Guess How Court Will Decide

As the Supreme Court decision on subsidies looms, many are wondering:  which way is the court leaning?  Most experts agree it’s way too close to a call.

Wondering where things stand as we wait for the high court to announce its decision?

Here’s a good, plain speaking synopsis of why it’s too close to call.  It was reported by Amy Howe at SCOTUS Blog back in March right after the case was argued before the Supreme Court:

Facebook Iconfacebook like buttonTwitter Icontwitter follow buttonVisit Our LinkedIN Profile