confusion

UnitedHealthcare News Release Indicates Small Group Transitional Relief Plans (pre-ACA) Are Likely To Be Extended Beyond 2017

While we wait to see what happens with the New Trump Administration’s plans to repeal and replace………….

In a recent field communication pertaining to Small Group renewals, UnitedHealthcare (UHC) announced that they were making provisions for small employers with non-ACA compliant plans to have the option to keep those plans in place beyond 2017. This “Keep Your Plan” option from UHC is contingent upon the Transitional Relief provision being extended again as expected.  Our guess is that some of other carriers in the Small Group market will follow suit.

The Transitional Relief provision was first enacted when the ACA went into full effect in 2014. Often referred to as the “Keep Your Plan” provision, this provision was extended twice after it first went into effect.  Under the last extension all plans not compliant with ACA were set to expire 12/31/2017.

In January, the new Trump Administration issued a memo “to waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation of any provision or requirement of the [ACA] that would impose a…cost…or regulatory burden on individuals, families, [or]…purchasers of health insurance.” UHC’s move indicates they expect the new Administration to issue another “Keep Your Plan” extension and that the expiration date will be postponed for at least another year (through 2018) and perhaps indefinitely.

UHC indicated that the Transitional Relief notice applies to: Arizona, Arkansas, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin.

We’ll be following closely and will keep our clients, especially those who currently have Transitional Relief Plans, posted.

For more info click on the links below:

Trump Administration Aims to Reduce Regulatory Burden

Previous Extension of Transition Policy for Non-ACA Compliant Health Plans Issued 2_29_16

ACA in 2017… Stay Tuned

What do we see?

Our opinion was that if Hillary Clinton had won, ACA would have gotten the heavy lift it would have needed to advance.  The difficult regulations would have been imposed (vs delayed further) and the money would have been allocated from general funds to stabilize the market.

Without the heavy lift, big trouble for ACA would be on the horizon.

The horizon is here.  What we see initially is that the regulations will start to go away (changed or ignored) and cash infusion will not happen.  What remains to be seen is what the party  in power will do to replace the law.  Doing nothing will almost be a replacement, but to what?  The Republicans do have various plans, but which course they will follow remains to be scene.

Our job will be to let you know how this will affect you and your people.  As of today, we just hold the course.  The taxes and reporting requirements are still in place. The plans on the market have not changed.  We will keep you aware as things change. If things hit your radar or you have questions on what you read or hear, please let us know and we will dig in.

For more on the latest:  ACA Compliance Bulletin — Congress Clears Path for ACA Repeal

EMPLOYER REIMBURSEMENT OF INDIVIDUAL HEALTHPLAN PREMIUMS REMAINS A BANNED PRACTICE UNDER ACA

While this was more of a hot topic when the full monty of healthcare reform was implemented back in 2014, some employers perhaps unaware of the turmoil in the individual marketplace still ask about reimbursing employees for individual health insurance policies.

The IRS, the Department of Labor and Health and Human Services have all released several directives and guidelines that pretty clearly prohibit the practice. The most recent was issued in December 2015 (n-15-17).

Definition of Predicament: People Who Don’t Have Access to Employer Coverage, Aren’t Medicare Eligible, and Don’t Qualify for Subsidies

Yes, this is a bit anecdotal. Nevertheless, I think it’s  worth reporting and some may find it interesting.

First, recently our team managed the annual open enrollment process for the group health plan of one of our employer clients. After a quick but thoughtful evaluation of options, one employee who was previously covered by an individual market policy opted to enroll on the employer’s group plan (family coverage) and terminate coverage under the individual market plan. Both the individual plan and the group plan were Qualified Health Plans (QHP) under ACA. The plans had similar benefits. And, they were underwritten by the same large insurance carrier.

Savings?

$600 a month in gross premium. That’s quite a spread.  Add in the employer contribution and the savings to the employee were even greater.

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