enrollment

Medicare Eligible Employees/Dependents…. Don’t Assume You Can Waive Part B

Medicare can be tricky when it is coordinating with Group Health Coverage.

This is especially true when Medicare enrollees WAIVE Part B coverage, thinking that they don’t need it because they have Group Health Coverage.

Our message to those people is BE CAREFUL. You must be certain that if you waive Part B coverage that you are not opening yourself up to claims exposure.

Never assume that a Group Health Plan will step in and cover claims.

Since CMS clearly states that the INDIVIDUAL is responsible to know (not the employer nor the insurance company) the Medicare coordination with other coverage, it is critical to be careful and do the research.

Here are some examples where things get tricky:

  • When an employer has fewer than 20 employees, Medicare is primary. With some insurance companies they do not even pay claims if Medicare does not approve. If one does not enroll in Part B, that means NOTHING is approved by Medicare. Translation: Costs that would have gone to Part B are not approved by Medicare and not approved by the insurance company. This is a big problem.
  • When an employer has fewer than 100 employees, Medicare that is DUE TO DISABILITY is primary. The same rules apply.
  • When someone is on COBRA and Medicare, Medicare is primary no matter how many employees the employer has. If the member on COBRA waives Part B, they face potential liability. People could easily assume that the rules would be the same as when they were active on the plan (vs COBRA), but that would be a mistake.

While we at BBG will help our clients get the right answer and try to fix things if someone has assumed the wrong thing, we urge everyone who is Medicare eligible to engage to find the right answers. We are not responsible for errors in Medicare enrollment, but we can be a resource for assistance.

No one should assume that waiving Medicare Part B coverage will be just fine. Getting the right answers and keeping the documentation is critical if you waive Part B.

Medicare 101

MEDICARE PANIC SETTING IN AS EMPLOYEES APPROACH 65th BIRTHDAY??? LET’S CLEAR UP THE CONFUSION ABOUT INITIAL ENROLLMENT

Can’t tell you how many calls and emails we get from panic-stricken employees nearing that magic 65th birthday and Medicare eligibility.  It happens a lot.  A whole lot.

Some folks think if they don’t sign up three months before they turn 65 they’ll be in trouble. Others think the drop dead date to sign up is their birthday.  And, many, many people think if they don’t enroll in Medicare by those dates they either won’t be eligible at all, or they’ll be penalized and get socked with much higher premiums.

Here’s the scoop:

THE MEDICARE INITIAL ENROLLMENT PERIOD IS 7 MONTHS LONG.  IT INCLUDES YOUR BIRTHDAY MONTH, THE 3 MONTHS BEFORE AND THE 3 MONTHS AFTER.

Here are some basics, courtesy of Medicare Made Clear, that employees approaching their 65th birthday may want to know and save them from hitting the panic button:

1.)  You Have a Set Time to Enroll in Medicare

Your Medicare Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) is 7 months long. It includes:

  • The 3 months before the month you turn 65
  • The month you turn 65
  • The 3 months after the month you turn 65

Medicare Enrollment Date Calculator.

2.)  You Can Delay Medicare Part B

Most people get Part A (hospital insurance) premium-free because they or a spouse worked and paid taxes. Part B (medical insurance) has a monthly premium.

You can delay signing up for Part B if you have other health care coverage like employer-sponsored health coverage.  Having employer-sponsored health coverage gives you to the option to delay signing up for Part B, qualifies you for a Special Enrollment Period, and precludes you from getting hit with Late Enrollment Penalties if you elect to delay Part B.

3.)  There Are Two Ways to Get Medicare

Medicare gives you two Medicare Coverage Options:

  • Original Medicare (Parts A & B), the traditional way
  • Medicare Advantage (Part C), an alternative to Original Medicare

Original Medicare is administered by the federal government. Medicare Advantage plans are offered by private insurance companies approved by Medicare. They must provide all the same benefits as Original Medicare Parts A and B. Many plans include additional benefits, such as prescription drug coverage and more.

4.)  Medicare Doesn’t Cover Everything

Original Medicare doesn’t include coverage for prescription drugs. You may buy a standalone Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D) plan to get this coverage.

Some people also buy a Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) plan to help with some costs not paid by Original Medicare.

Generally, you don’t need additional coverage if you choose a Medicare Advantage plan.

 

7 Months. That should make some breathe easier.

THE LAW OF DISPROPORTIONATE COSTS: SMALL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES ACCOUNT FOR LION’S SHARE OF GROUP HEALTH PLAN MEDICAL COSTS

There’s plenty of cost related analytics available to support the disproportionate cost premise that medical expenses are highly concentrated among a very small proportion of enrolled employees.  These highlights, for example, from a Agency for Healthcare Research and Policy (AHRQ) are pretty telling:

  • 1 % of the population accounts for 21.4 % of total health care expenditures nationally
  • 5 % of the population account for 49.9 % of total expenditures
  • 10 % of accounts for 65.6 % of all medical costs

Definition of Predicament: People Who Don’t Have Access to Employer Coverage, Aren’t Medicare Eligible, and Don’t Qualify for Subsidies

Yes, this is a bit anecdotal. Nevertheless, I think it’s  worth reporting and some may find it interesting.

First, recently our team managed the annual open enrollment process for the group health plan of one of our employer clients. After a quick but thoughtful evaluation of options, one employee who was previously covered by an individual market policy opted to enroll on the employer’s group plan (family coverage) and terminate coverage under the individual market plan. Both the individual plan and the group plan were Qualified Health Plans (QHP) under ACA. The plans had similar benefits. And, they were underwritten by the same large insurance carrier.

Savings?

$600 a month in gross premium. That’s quite a spread.  Add in the employer contribution and the savings to the employee were even greater.

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