exchange

As Expected, States Will Have More Control and Greater Flexibility in Regulating Obamacare Starting in 2019

In a CMS press release the Trump Administration announced yesterday, as expected, that beginning in 2019 individual states will have more control and greater flexibility in regulating the individual health insurance market and the Obamacare Marketplace (aka the Exchange). In a summary of the “final 2019 Payment Notice Rule” CMS highlighted provisions that were intended to increase flexibility, improve affordability, and decrease administrative burdens.

 

It’s likely that changes made at the individual state level will ultimately have some impact either directly or indirectly on employer sponsored health coverage, particularly the small group market. We will be monitoring this very closely for our clients and will report back, especially as we get closer to 2019 and more information becomes available.

In the meantime, here’s a sampling of the headlines and links to the respective articles following yesterday’s announcement by CMS:

Here’s a link to the CMS press release:

 

Health FSA Limit Will Increase for 2018

The ACA imposes a maximum dollar limit on employee contributions to health flexible spending accounts (FSAs).  Although the ACA set this limit at $2,500, the limit is indexed for cost-of-living adjustments each year.  On Oct. 19, 2017, the IRS announced that, for taxable years beginning in 2018, the dollar limit on employees’ salary reduction contributions to a health FSA will increase to $2,650.


Employers may continue to impose their own dollar limits on employee contributions to health FSAs, as long as the employer’s limit does not exceed the ACA’s maximum limit in effect for the plan year.  For example, an employer may decide to continue limiting employee health FSA contributions for the 2018 plan year to $2,500.


Go here for more information.

Health FSA Limit Will Increase for 2018 10-19-17

Executive Order Ends the “Out-of-Pocket” Subsidy Only; the “Premium” Subsidy Remains in Place

Some folks may think that Friday’s Executive Order did away with Obamacare subsidies altogether.  It didn’t.

There are two subsidies. One was cut.  One wasn’t.

In a nutshell, one subsidy lowers the cost of premium (aka premium tax credits) for those qualified individuals and families enrolled through the exchange and making less than 400% above the poverty level.  This stays in place.

The other covers a reduction in the out-of- pocket expenses or claims costs paid to the medical provider by the patient (aka cost-sharing reductions). This subsidy applies to those earning below 250% of the poverty level and covered by a plan issued by the insurance company through the exchange.

It’s this out-of-pocket budget appropriation that was cut by Friday’s Executive Order.

From what we hear, despite Friday’s Order most of those enrollees who qualify for the out-of-pocket assistance will continue to receive it as part of their coverage at least through 2018.  Many of the insurance carriers still participating on the exchange expected the subsidy cut and planned for it when they filed their rate increases and established their pricing for 2018.

You can read more here.

Now That ACA Remains in Place Maybe We Should Keep An Eye On This Recent HHS Letter to Governors.

“……We are seeking to empower states with new opportunities that will strengthen their health insurance markets.”

Thomas E. Price, M.D., The Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), A Letter To Governors, dated March 13, 2017

 

On March 13, 2017, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) sent a letter to state governors to highlight Section 1332 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Beginning in 2017, Section 1332 allows states to apply for a State Innovation Waiver from certain ACA requirements.

With the lawmakers firmly stuck in the healthcare mud, one wonders if some states might start to make health insurance changes on their own. Under a little known provision of the Affordable Care Act (Section 1332) called the State Innovation Waiver, states have the ability to make changes by applying for waivers from certain major provisions of the law beginning this year (2017).  These waivers are intended to allow states the flexibility to pursue innovative strategies for providing their residents with access to high quality, affordable health insurance, while retaining some of the consumer protections of the ACA.

Examples of things that may be waived include:

  • Establishment of qualified health plans (QHPs);
  • Consumer choices and insurance competition through the Exchanges;
  • Premium tax credits and cost-sharing reductions for plans offered within the Exchanges;
  • The employer shared responsibility rules; and
  • The individual mandate.

While this provision and Price’s recent letter on the subject seemingly flew under the radar, you have to wonder if we might start to see some states initiating their own changes to Obamacare. If this is going to happen, we’ll likely start hearing about it in the next few months.  Sometime this summer is when carriers submit rate increases or announce intentions to withdraw from the individual market all together.  Analysts are predicting both to happen.  It’s anticipated carriers will request huge rate increases — sticker shock on steroids — for individual plans on and off exchange.  And, more carriers are expected to be leaving the individual market.  Aetna and UnitedHealthcare are already out, and Bloomberg recently reported that Anthem (BlueCross and Blue Shield in 14 states) is leaning toward exiting in most if not all of its markets.

I doubt anyone really knows where all this is going, or where it will end up. Maybe some states will act, maybe not.

One thing that’s almost certain: Access to employer sponsored health plans will be more important than any time since Obamacare (ACA) became law.

Here’s a link to more info:  HHS Promotes ACA Section 1332 Waivers

Page 1 of 612345...Last »
Facebook Iconfacebook like buttonTwitter Icontwitter follow buttonVisit Our LinkedIN Profile